nintendontdodrugs:


Chris Ramsey calling out Katie Hopkins for her views on fat people.
nintendontdodrugs:


Chris Ramsey calling out Katie Hopkins for her views on fat people.

nintendontdodrugs:

Chris Ramsey calling out Katie Hopkins for her views on fat people.

(via wiyesnaforever)


Q: Is Fandry’s story based on your childhood?
MANJULE: Fandry is a coming-of-age story about Jabya, a boy belonging to the Kaikadi community. His family survives by doing petty jobs in the village and also has the extra responsibility of catching the pigs in the village. I was born in the Wadar community in Solapur’s Karmala area. Our profession was to break stones. Though my father never caught pigs, we were actually expected to do that. As a schoolboy, I was ashamed of this reality. Fandry is the word used for pigs in my village and they used to commonly call us too by the same name. Nobody saw anything wrong in this. It was an insult to me, but I had no idea why it was me who was suffering. As a student, my caste was imprinted on me even in school.
Q: Why did you pick caste as the theme for both your first films?
MANJULE: Caste is the reality of our society. Those who don’t suffer the discrimination feel there is no casteism. Just because the middle class thinks that casteism has vanished doesn’t make it a reality. Take the very simple example of marriage. Does a Brahmin groom voluntarily look for a Dalit bride? Caste has become a part of our routine life. Look around you, check among your friends and close circles. I have not tried to profess anything in the film; I only wanted to show the reality.
Q: In an industry where people are hesitant to take a stand on any issue, don’t you think you will be sidelined for your strong views?
MANJULE: Being an Ambedkarite is an honour and there is nothing wrong in it, nothing to hide. He professed the ideology of equality; and was not for any particular caste. He showed the way that every progressive person would like to follow. What’s wrong in following him? I am really not bothered about being sidelined. I was never on the centre stage so how can I be sidelined?
I don’t have high aspirations of being part of the glamour world or the talk-of-the-town. I want to tell my stories to people in my own way. I have my friends, who will be with me in future. I am happy with them.
Q: Many think that Fandry’s end supports violence. What do you think?
MANJULE: If you think that a small boy throwing stones amounts to violence, how do you evaluate society’s treatment of that boy and his family before that? Wasn’t that violence? As a society, we have the habit of calling any retaliation by the oppressed section as violence. We conveniently ignore the oppression and choose to see it as a way of life.
via

Q: Is Fandry’s story based on your childhood?
MANJULE: Fandry is a coming-of-age story about Jabya, a boy belonging to the Kaikadi community. His family survives by doing petty jobs in the village and also has the extra responsibility of catching the pigs in the village. I was born in the Wadar community in Solapur’s Karmala area. Our profession was to break stones. Though my father never caught pigs, we were actually expected to do that. As a schoolboy, I was ashamed of this reality. Fandry is the word used for pigs in my village and they used to commonly call us too by the same name. Nobody saw anything wrong in this. It was an insult to me, but I had no idea why it was me who was suffering. As a student, my caste was imprinted on me even in school.
Q: Why did you pick caste as the theme for both your first films?
MANJULE: Caste is the reality of our society. Those who don’t suffer the discrimination feel there is no casteism. Just because the middle class thinks that casteism has vanished doesn’t make it a reality. Take the very simple example of marriage. Does a Brahmin groom voluntarily look for a Dalit bride? Caste has become a part of our routine life. Look around you, check among your friends and close circles. I have not tried to profess anything in the film; I only wanted to show the reality.
Q: In an industry where people are hesitant to take a stand on any issue, don’t you think you will be sidelined for your strong views?
MANJULE: Being an Ambedkarite is an honour and there is nothing wrong in it, nothing to hide. He professed the ideology of equality; and was not for any particular caste. He showed the way that every progressive person would like to follow. What’s wrong in following him? I am really not bothered about being sidelined. I was never on the centre stage so how can I be sidelined?
I don’t have high aspirations of being part of the glamour world or the talk-of-the-town. I want to tell my stories to people in my own way. I have my friends, who will be with me in future. I am happy with them.
Q: Many think that Fandry’s end supports violence. What do you think?
MANJULE: If you think that a small boy throwing stones amounts to violence, how do you evaluate society’s treatment of that boy and his family before that? Wasn’t that violence? As a society, we have the habit of calling any retaliation by the oppressed section as violence. We conveniently ignore the oppression and choose to see it as a way of life.
via

Q: Is Fandry’s story based on your childhood?
MANJULE: Fandry is a coming-of-age story about Jabya, a boy belonging to the Kaikadi community. His family survives by doing petty jobs in the village and also has the extra responsibility of catching the pigs in the village. I was born in the Wadar community in Solapur’s Karmala area. Our profession was to break stones. Though my father never caught pigs, we were actually expected to do that. As a schoolboy, I was ashamed of this reality. Fandry is the word used for pigs in my village and they used to commonly call us too by the same name. Nobody saw anything wrong in this. It was an insult to me, but I had no idea why it was me who was suffering. As a student, my caste was imprinted on me even in school.
Q: Why did you pick caste as the theme for both your first films?
MANJULE: Caste is the reality of our society. Those who don’t suffer the discrimination feel there is no casteism. Just because the middle class thinks that casteism has vanished doesn’t make it a reality. Take the very simple example of marriage. Does a Brahmin groom voluntarily look for a Dalit bride? Caste has become a part of our routine life. Look around you, check among your friends and close circles. I have not tried to profess anything in the film; I only wanted to show the reality.
Q: In an industry where people are hesitant to take a stand on any issue, don’t you think you will be sidelined for your strong views?
MANJULE: Being an Ambedkarite is an honour and there is nothing wrong in it, nothing to hide. He professed the ideology of equality; and was not for any particular caste. He showed the way that every progressive person would like to follow. What’s wrong in following him? I am really not bothered about being sidelined. I was never on the centre stage so how can I be sidelined?
I don’t have high aspirations of being part of the glamour world or the talk-of-the-town. I want to tell my stories to people in my own way. I have my friends, who will be with me in future. I am happy with them.
Q: Many think that Fandry’s end supports violence. What do you think?
MANJULE: If you think that a small boy throwing stones amounts to violence, how do you evaluate society’s treatment of that boy and his family before that? Wasn’t that violence? As a society, we have the habit of calling any retaliation by the oppressed section as violence. We conveniently ignore the oppression and choose to see it as a way of life.
via

Q: Is Fandry’s story based on your childhood?
MANJULE: Fandry is a coming-of-age story about Jabya, a boy belonging to the Kaikadi community. His family survives by doing petty jobs in the village and also has the extra responsibility of catching the pigs in the village. I was born in the Wadar community in Solapur’s Karmala area. Our profession was to break stones. Though my father never caught pigs, we were actually expected to do that. As a schoolboy, I was ashamed of this reality. Fandry is the word used for pigs in my village and they used to commonly call us too by the same name. Nobody saw anything wrong in this. It was an insult to me, but I had no idea why it was me who was suffering. As a student, my caste was imprinted on me even in school.
Q: Why did you pick caste as the theme for both your first films?
MANJULE: Caste is the reality of our society. Those who don’t suffer the discrimination feel there is no casteism. Just because the middle class thinks that casteism has vanished doesn’t make it a reality. Take the very simple example of marriage. Does a Brahmin groom voluntarily look for a Dalit bride? Caste has become a part of our routine life. Look around you, check among your friends and close circles. I have not tried to profess anything in the film; I only wanted to show the reality.
Q: In an industry where people are hesitant to take a stand on any issue, don’t you think you will be sidelined for your strong views?
MANJULE: Being an Ambedkarite is an honour and there is nothing wrong in it, nothing to hide. He professed the ideology of equality; and was not for any particular caste. He showed the way that every progressive person would like to follow. What’s wrong in following him? I am really not bothered about being sidelined. I was never on the centre stage so how can I be sidelined?
I don’t have high aspirations of being part of the glamour world or the talk-of-the-town. I want to tell my stories to people in my own way. I have my friends, who will be with me in future. I am happy with them.
Q: Many think that Fandry’s end supports violence. What do you think?
MANJULE: If you think that a small boy throwing stones amounts to violence, how do you evaluate society’s treatment of that boy and his family before that? Wasn’t that violence? As a society, we have the habit of calling any retaliation by the oppressed section as violence. We conveniently ignore the oppression and choose to see it as a way of life.
via

Q: Is Fandry’s story based on your childhood?
MANJULE: Fandry is a coming-of-age story about Jabya, a boy belonging to the Kaikadi community. His family survives by doing petty jobs in the village and also has the extra responsibility of catching the pigs in the village. I was born in the Wadar community in Solapur’s Karmala area. Our profession was to break stones. Though my father never caught pigs, we were actually expected to do that. As a schoolboy, I was ashamed of this reality. Fandry is the word used for pigs in my village and they used to commonly call us too by the same name. Nobody saw anything wrong in this. It was an insult to me, but I had no idea why it was me who was suffering. As a student, my caste was imprinted on me even in school.
Q: Why did you pick caste as the theme for both your first films?
MANJULE: Caste is the reality of our society. Those who don’t suffer the discrimination feel there is no casteism. Just because the middle class thinks that casteism has vanished doesn’t make it a reality. Take the very simple example of marriage. Does a Brahmin groom voluntarily look for a Dalit bride? Caste has become a part of our routine life. Look around you, check among your friends and close circles. I have not tried to profess anything in the film; I only wanted to show the reality.
Q: In an industry where people are hesitant to take a stand on any issue, don’t you think you will be sidelined for your strong views?
MANJULE: Being an Ambedkarite is an honour and there is nothing wrong in it, nothing to hide. He professed the ideology of equality; and was not for any particular caste. He showed the way that every progressive person would like to follow. What’s wrong in following him? I am really not bothered about being sidelined. I was never on the centre stage so how can I be sidelined?
I don’t have high aspirations of being part of the glamour world or the talk-of-the-town. I want to tell my stories to people in my own way. I have my friends, who will be with me in future. I am happy with them.
Q: Many think that Fandry’s end supports violence. What do you think?
MANJULE: If you think that a small boy throwing stones amounts to violence, how do you evaluate society’s treatment of that boy and his family before that? Wasn’t that violence? As a society, we have the habit of calling any retaliation by the oppressed section as violence. We conveniently ignore the oppression and choose to see it as a way of life.
via

Q: Is Fandry’s story based on your childhood?

MANJULE: Fandry is a coming-of-age story about Jabya, a boy belonging to the Kaikadi community. His family survives by doing petty jobs in the village and also has the extra responsibility of catching the pigs in the village. I was born in the Wadar community in Solapur’s Karmala area. Our profession was to break stones. Though my father never caught pigs, we were actually expected to do that. As a schoolboy, I was ashamed of this reality. Fandry is the word used for pigs in my village and they used to commonly call us too by the same name. Nobody saw anything wrong in this. It was an insult to me, but I had no idea why it was me who was suffering. As a student, my caste was imprinted on me even in school.

Q: Why did you pick caste as the theme for both your first films?

MANJULE: Caste is the reality of our society. Those who don’t suffer the discrimination feel there is no casteism. Just because the middle class thinks that casteism has vanished doesn’t make it a reality. Take the very simple example of marriage. Does a Brahmin groom voluntarily look for a Dalit bride? Caste has become a part of our routine life. Look around you, check among your friends and close circles. I have not tried to profess anything in the film; I only wanted to show the reality.

Q: In an industry where people are hesitant to take a stand on any issue, don’t you think you will be sidelined for your strong views?

MANJULE: Being an Ambedkarite is an honour and there is nothing wrong in it, nothing to hide. He professed the ideology of equality; and was not for any particular caste. He showed the way that every progressive person would like to follow. What’s wrong in following him? I am really not bothered about being sidelined. I was never on the centre stage so how can I be sidelined?

I don’t have high aspirations of being part of the glamour world or the talk-of-the-town. I want to tell my stories to people in my own way. I have my friends, who will be with me in future. I am happy with them.

Q: Many think that Fandry’s end supports violence. What do you think?

MANJULE: If you think that a small boy throwing stones amounts to violence, how do you evaluate society’s treatment of that boy and his family before that? Wasn’t that violence? As a society, we have the habit of calling any retaliation by the oppressed section as violence. We conveniently ignore the oppression and choose to see it as a way of life.

via

(via seulmates)

“The only way to clamp down on my energy is to erase my emotions, and so I fold them each away, one by one. My sorrow turns to anger, then to ice-cold fury. My soul curls in on itself in defense. I am gone. I am truly gone.”
— Marie Lu The Young Elites (via sempiternale)
merbabe-against-misogyny:

thebaconsandwichofregret:

markatch:

unfriendlyblasianhottie:

the-goddamazon:

jeankd:

teamocorazon:


x

bless them for letting baby girl keep her heritage
I peep them braids and that dress

I was just thinking this. She actually takes the children back to visit their family in their home country and they study about their own cultures. She isn’t one of those white people trying to assimilate her non-white children. 

She doesn’t use her kids as props and accessories, and she loves and cherishes them all equally it looks like.

Not to mention how she lets John (Shiloh prefers to be called John) dress and act how they like

Also, I’m pretty sure her wedding dress has her kids’ drawings on it, which is just unbelievably adorable.

it does have her kids drawings on it, they also helped to write the vows and Maddox the eldest boy made the cake with his friends, which is probably why he looks so nervous in the picture of them cutting it.
Every single thing I hear about this wedding makes me so happy even though they’re complete strangers to me because it just seems so joyful.

I remember reading a while ago that when they hire nannies, they have a nanny from each child’s country of origin, who is fluent in their country’s native language, and can teach not just the individual child but the whole family about that country and culture. It’s really incredible how non-assimilative they’ve made their household.
merbabe-against-misogyny:

thebaconsandwichofregret:

markatch:

unfriendlyblasianhottie:

the-goddamazon:

jeankd:

teamocorazon:


x

bless them for letting baby girl keep her heritage
I peep them braids and that dress

I was just thinking this. She actually takes the children back to visit their family in their home country and they study about their own cultures. She isn’t one of those white people trying to assimilate her non-white children. 

She doesn’t use her kids as props and accessories, and she loves and cherishes them all equally it looks like.

Not to mention how she lets John (Shiloh prefers to be called John) dress and act how they like

Also, I’m pretty sure her wedding dress has her kids’ drawings on it, which is just unbelievably adorable.

it does have her kids drawings on it, they also helped to write the vows and Maddox the eldest boy made the cake with his friends, which is probably why he looks so nervous in the picture of them cutting it.
Every single thing I hear about this wedding makes me so happy even though they’re complete strangers to me because it just seems so joyful.

I remember reading a while ago that when they hire nannies, they have a nanny from each child’s country of origin, who is fluent in their country’s native language, and can teach not just the individual child but the whole family about that country and culture. It’s really incredible how non-assimilative they’ve made their household.
merbabe-against-misogyny:

thebaconsandwichofregret:

markatch:

unfriendlyblasianhottie:

the-goddamazon:

jeankd:

teamocorazon:


x

bless them for letting baby girl keep her heritage
I peep them braids and that dress

I was just thinking this. She actually takes the children back to visit their family in their home country and they study about their own cultures. She isn’t one of those white people trying to assimilate her non-white children. 

She doesn’t use her kids as props and accessories, and she loves and cherishes them all equally it looks like.

Not to mention how she lets John (Shiloh prefers to be called John) dress and act how they like

Also, I’m pretty sure her wedding dress has her kids’ drawings on it, which is just unbelievably adorable.

it does have her kids drawings on it, they also helped to write the vows and Maddox the eldest boy made the cake with his friends, which is probably why he looks so nervous in the picture of them cutting it.
Every single thing I hear about this wedding makes me so happy even though they’re complete strangers to me because it just seems so joyful.

I remember reading a while ago that when they hire nannies, they have a nanny from each child’s country of origin, who is fluent in their country’s native language, and can teach not just the individual child but the whole family about that country and culture. It’s really incredible how non-assimilative they’ve made their household.
merbabe-against-misogyny:

thebaconsandwichofregret:

markatch:

unfriendlyblasianhottie:

the-goddamazon:

jeankd:

teamocorazon:


x

bless them for letting baby girl keep her heritage
I peep them braids and that dress

I was just thinking this. She actually takes the children back to visit their family in their home country and they study about their own cultures. She isn’t one of those white people trying to assimilate her non-white children. 

She doesn’t use her kids as props and accessories, and she loves and cherishes them all equally it looks like.

Not to mention how she lets John (Shiloh prefers to be called John) dress and act how they like

Also, I’m pretty sure her wedding dress has her kids’ drawings on it, which is just unbelievably adorable.

it does have her kids drawings on it, they also helped to write the vows and Maddox the eldest boy made the cake with his friends, which is probably why he looks so nervous in the picture of them cutting it.
Every single thing I hear about this wedding makes me so happy even though they’re complete strangers to me because it just seems so joyful.

I remember reading a while ago that when they hire nannies, they have a nanny from each child’s country of origin, who is fluent in their country’s native language, and can teach not just the individual child but the whole family about that country and culture. It’s really incredible how non-assimilative they’ve made their household.

merbabe-against-misogyny:

thebaconsandwichofregret:

markatch:

unfriendlyblasianhottie:

the-goddamazon:

jeankd:

teamocorazon:

x

bless them for letting baby girl keep her heritage

I peep them braids and that dress

I was just thinking this. She actually takes the children back to visit their family in their home country and they study about their own cultures. She isn’t one of those white people trying to assimilate her non-white children. 

She doesn’t use her kids as props and accessories, and she loves and cherishes them all equally it looks like.

Not to mention how she lets John (Shiloh prefers to be called John) dress and act how they like

Also, I’m pretty sure her wedding dress has her kids’ drawings on it, which is just unbelievably adorable.

it does have her kids drawings on it, they also helped to write the vows and Maddox the eldest boy made the cake with his friends, which is probably why he looks so nervous in the picture of them cutting it.

Every single thing I hear about this wedding makes me so happy even though they’re complete strangers to me because it just seems so joyful.

I remember reading a while ago that when they hire nannies, they have a nanny from each child’s country of origin, who is fluent in their country’s native language, and can teach not just the individual child but the whole family about that country and culture. It’s really incredible how non-assimilative they’ve made their household.

(via am-artist)

superhighschoollevelpessimist:

eneko-wweh:

mr-egbutt:

tyleroakley:

witchhctiw:

the-solitary-witch:

warriorsatthedisco:

Its called the Death Waltz, and was written as a joke but people have attempted it on piano.

Saxes move downstage.

I’ll just leave this here.

SWEET JESUS CLICK THAT

the added directions are great.
'insert peanuts'
'gradually become irritated'
'cresc., or not'
'untie slip knot'
'bow real fast, slippage may occur'

Release the penguins

omg

(via brycenjm)


missbunnyluna: Thirty-one Days of Halloween: The Addams Family
                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

missbunnyluna: Thirty-one Days of Halloween: The Addams Family
                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

missbunnyluna: Thirty-one Days of Halloween: The Addams Family
                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

missbunnyluna: Thirty-one Days of Halloween: The Addams Family
                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

missbunnyluna: Thirty-one Days of Halloween: The Addams Family
                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

missbunnyluna: Thirty-one Days of Halloween: The Addams Family
                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

missbunnyluna: Thirty-one Days of Halloween: The Addams Family
                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

missbunnyluna: Thirty-one Days of Halloween: The Addams Family
                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

missbunnyluna: Thirty-one Days of Halloween: The Addams Family
                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

missbunnyluna: Thirty-one Days of Halloween: The Addams Family
                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

missbunnylunaThirty-one Days of HalloweenThe Addams Family

                      ↳ Morticia Addams + Excellent Parenting Skills

(via jupitervelvet)

sixpenceee:

Information from this post received from financedegreecenter.com, all image credits and information go them. 

I think this is a question we’ve all been wondering about.

Did you know that organ trade is illegal in every country except Iran?

BODY PARTS THE LIVING CAN SELL

$337 per pint of blood.

$70 for ten inches of hair.

  • Men’s hair is reduced to an amino acid used in baking goods.
  • Women’s hair is turned into wigs and weaves.

Bone Marrow

  • The most valuable part of your body sells for a high of $23,000 per gram. You can donate bone marrow, but it’s illegal to sell it.

Eggs: $12,400 per IVF cycle in U.S.

  • Egg donation is legal, but some choose to avoid hospital fees and buy eggs illegally or abroad.

Surrogate Wombs: $20,000-30,000 in India, $80,000-150,000 in the U.S.

Kidneys

  • Make up 75% of the global organ trade due to diabetes, high blood pressure and heart problems.

Theoretically, your body is worth up to $45 million dollars
(But that’s only if you could harvest every usable chemical and part from it.)

FROM THE DEAD

  • Corneas: $24,400 implanted
  • Hearts: Legal–$997,700, Illegal– $119,000
  • Livers: Legal–$557,100, Illegal–$157,100
  • Kidneys–From U.S. $262,900
  • China–$62,000
  • India–$15,000
  • Ligaments and Bones– A few thousand dollars, depending on which one.
  • Skin–$10 per square inch
  • Skeletons–$2,993-5,500

SOURCES OF BODY PARTS

Legal:

  • Donated by Family, Friends
  • Charities, non-profits

Illegal: 

  • Looted Graves
  • Crooked morticians
  • Paid donors (often very poor)
  • Executed prisoners
  • Live prisoners
  • Blood Farms

(via fantasiesandflowers)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Anoek Steketee
Love Radio
Love Radio is a transmedia documentary about the process of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda, based on the popular radio soap ‘Musekeweya’ (New Dawn). It consists of a web documentary, mobile Tap stories and an exhibition. The project straddles the thin line between fact and fiction. At first glance it tells a linear, almost fairy-tale narrative. But a closer look reveals the complex reality. While in the soap happy endings predominate, reconciliation in real life is rather more intransigent. After the gruesome killings, how can perpetrators and victims live with and love each other?April 2014 marks 20 years since almost one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered. Virulent hate campaigns in the media were at the heart of the genocide. On the same frequency that in 1994 incited the murder of the Tutsi ‘inyenzi’ (cockroaches), the radio soap Musekeweya today broadcasts a message of reconciliation. The soap is immensely popular, with millions tuning in to the weekly episodes.
Love Radio is a collaboration with journalist Eefje Blankevoort, designers Kummer & Herrman and interactive designer Sara Kolster.www.loveradio-rwanda.org darksilenceinsuburbia:

Anoek Steketee
Love Radio
Love Radio is a transmedia documentary about the process of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda, based on the popular radio soap ‘Musekeweya’ (New Dawn). It consists of a web documentary, mobile Tap stories and an exhibition. The project straddles the thin line between fact and fiction. At first glance it tells a linear, almost fairy-tale narrative. But a closer look reveals the complex reality. While in the soap happy endings predominate, reconciliation in real life is rather more intransigent. After the gruesome killings, how can perpetrators and victims live with and love each other?April 2014 marks 20 years since almost one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered. Virulent hate campaigns in the media were at the heart of the genocide. On the same frequency that in 1994 incited the murder of the Tutsi ‘inyenzi’ (cockroaches), the radio soap Musekeweya today broadcasts a message of reconciliation. The soap is immensely popular, with millions tuning in to the weekly episodes.
Love Radio is a collaboration with journalist Eefje Blankevoort, designers Kummer & Herrman and interactive designer Sara Kolster.www.loveradio-rwanda.org darksilenceinsuburbia:

Anoek Steketee
Love Radio
Love Radio is a transmedia documentary about the process of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda, based on the popular radio soap ‘Musekeweya’ (New Dawn). It consists of a web documentary, mobile Tap stories and an exhibition. The project straddles the thin line between fact and fiction. At first glance it tells a linear, almost fairy-tale narrative. But a closer look reveals the complex reality. While in the soap happy endings predominate, reconciliation in real life is rather more intransigent. After the gruesome killings, how can perpetrators and victims live with and love each other?April 2014 marks 20 years since almost one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered. Virulent hate campaigns in the media were at the heart of the genocide. On the same frequency that in 1994 incited the murder of the Tutsi ‘inyenzi’ (cockroaches), the radio soap Musekeweya today broadcasts a message of reconciliation. The soap is immensely popular, with millions tuning in to the weekly episodes.
Love Radio is a collaboration with journalist Eefje Blankevoort, designers Kummer & Herrman and interactive designer Sara Kolster.www.loveradio-rwanda.org darksilenceinsuburbia:

Anoek Steketee
Love Radio
Love Radio is a transmedia documentary about the process of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda, based on the popular radio soap ‘Musekeweya’ (New Dawn). It consists of a web documentary, mobile Tap stories and an exhibition. The project straddles the thin line between fact and fiction. At first glance it tells a linear, almost fairy-tale narrative. But a closer look reveals the complex reality. While in the soap happy endings predominate, reconciliation in real life is rather more intransigent. After the gruesome killings, how can perpetrators and victims live with and love each other?April 2014 marks 20 years since almost one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered. Virulent hate campaigns in the media were at the heart of the genocide. On the same frequency that in 1994 incited the murder of the Tutsi ‘inyenzi’ (cockroaches), the radio soap Musekeweya today broadcasts a message of reconciliation. The soap is immensely popular, with millions tuning in to the weekly episodes.
Love Radio is a collaboration with journalist Eefje Blankevoort, designers Kummer & Herrman and interactive designer Sara Kolster.www.loveradio-rwanda.org darksilenceinsuburbia:

Anoek Steketee
Love Radio
Love Radio is a transmedia documentary about the process of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda, based on the popular radio soap ‘Musekeweya’ (New Dawn). It consists of a web documentary, mobile Tap stories and an exhibition. The project straddles the thin line between fact and fiction. At first glance it tells a linear, almost fairy-tale narrative. But a closer look reveals the complex reality. While in the soap happy endings predominate, reconciliation in real life is rather more intransigent. After the gruesome killings, how can perpetrators and victims live with and love each other?April 2014 marks 20 years since almost one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered. Virulent hate campaigns in the media were at the heart of the genocide. On the same frequency that in 1994 incited the murder of the Tutsi ‘inyenzi’ (cockroaches), the radio soap Musekeweya today broadcasts a message of reconciliation. The soap is immensely popular, with millions tuning in to the weekly episodes.
Love Radio is a collaboration with journalist Eefje Blankevoort, designers Kummer & Herrman and interactive designer Sara Kolster.www.loveradio-rwanda.org darksilenceinsuburbia:

Anoek Steketee
Love Radio
Love Radio is a transmedia documentary about the process of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda, based on the popular radio soap ‘Musekeweya’ (New Dawn). It consists of a web documentary, mobile Tap stories and an exhibition. The project straddles the thin line between fact and fiction. At first glance it tells a linear, almost fairy-tale narrative. But a closer look reveals the complex reality. While in the soap happy endings predominate, reconciliation in real life is rather more intransigent. After the gruesome killings, how can perpetrators and victims live with and love each other?April 2014 marks 20 years since almost one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered. Virulent hate campaigns in the media were at the heart of the genocide. On the same frequency that in 1994 incited the murder of the Tutsi ‘inyenzi’ (cockroaches), the radio soap Musekeweya today broadcasts a message of reconciliation. The soap is immensely popular, with millions tuning in to the weekly episodes.
Love Radio is a collaboration with journalist Eefje Blankevoort, designers Kummer & Herrman and interactive designer Sara Kolster.www.loveradio-rwanda.org darksilenceinsuburbia:

Anoek Steketee
Love Radio
Love Radio is a transmedia documentary about the process of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda, based on the popular radio soap ‘Musekeweya’ (New Dawn). It consists of a web documentary, mobile Tap stories and an exhibition. The project straddles the thin line between fact and fiction. At first glance it tells a linear, almost fairy-tale narrative. But a closer look reveals the complex reality. While in the soap happy endings predominate, reconciliation in real life is rather more intransigent. After the gruesome killings, how can perpetrators and victims live with and love each other?April 2014 marks 20 years since almost one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered. Virulent hate campaigns in the media were at the heart of the genocide. On the same frequency that in 1994 incited the murder of the Tutsi ‘inyenzi’ (cockroaches), the radio soap Musekeweya today broadcasts a message of reconciliation. The soap is immensely popular, with millions tuning in to the weekly episodes.
Love Radio is a collaboration with journalist Eefje Blankevoort, designers Kummer & Herrman and interactive designer Sara Kolster.www.loveradio-rwanda.org darksilenceinsuburbia:

Anoek Steketee
Love Radio
Love Radio is a transmedia documentary about the process of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda, based on the popular radio soap ‘Musekeweya’ (New Dawn). It consists of a web documentary, mobile Tap stories and an exhibition. The project straddles the thin line between fact and fiction. At first glance it tells a linear, almost fairy-tale narrative. But a closer look reveals the complex reality. While in the soap happy endings predominate, reconciliation in real life is rather more intransigent. After the gruesome killings, how can perpetrators and victims live with and love each other?April 2014 marks 20 years since almost one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered. Virulent hate campaigns in the media were at the heart of the genocide. On the same frequency that in 1994 incited the murder of the Tutsi ‘inyenzi’ (cockroaches), the radio soap Musekeweya today broadcasts a message of reconciliation. The soap is immensely popular, with millions tuning in to the weekly episodes.
Love Radio is a collaboration with journalist Eefje Blankevoort, designers Kummer & Herrman and interactive designer Sara Kolster.www.loveradio-rwanda.org

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Anoek Steketee

Love Radio

Love Radio is a transmedia documentary about the process of reconciliation in post-genocide Rwanda, based on the popular radio soap ‘Musekeweya’ (New Dawn). 
It consists of a web documentary, mobile Tap stories and an exhibition. 
The project straddles the thin line between fact and fiction. At first glance it tells a linear, almost fairy-tale narrative. But a closer look reveals the complex reality. While in the soap happy endings predominate, reconciliation in real life is rather more intransigent. After the gruesome killings, how can perpetrators and victims live with and love each other?

April 2014 marks 20 years since almost one million Tutsis and moderate Hutus were murdered. Virulent hate campaigns in the media were at the heart of the genocide. On the same frequency that in 1994 incited the murder of the Tutsi ‘inyenzi’ (cockroaches), the radio soap Musekeweya today broadcasts a message of reconciliation. The soap is immensely popular, with millions tuning in to the weekly episodes.

Love Radio is a collaboration with journalist Eefje Blankevoort, designers Kummer & Herrman and interactive designer Sara Kolster.


www.loveradio-rwanda.org

milquetoastism:

The Louvre Abu Dhabi Museum, designed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel.
milquetoastism:

The Louvre Abu Dhabi Museum, designed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel.

milquetoastism:

The Louvre Abu Dhabi Museum, designed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel.

(via dreamfulartist)

probably-a-succubus:

tom-sits-like-a-whore:

carryonmywayward-idjits:

Please excuse me while I walk over your husband’s corpse like he’s nothing and upon entering the room, ignore your traumatised child in his crib and instead clutch your lifeless body in a demonstration of my love for you: creepy and entirely unhelpful

i love how everyone just knows what this is referencing

i dont and i am slightly mortified

(via prettythingsandbigwords)

seulmates:

micdotcom:

Ebola fear is turning into all-out racism

The American public’s reaction to the Ebola virus outbreak that’s killed over 4,000 people has moved from concern to outright xenophobia

Call it “Ebola racism.” With the death of Liberian Thomas E.Duncan at a Dallas hospital last week and news that two nurses who treated him have contracted the deadly illness, increasingly paranoid Americans are treating immigrants and visitors from Ebola-ravaged countries like Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone like lepers. 

"People, once they know you are Liberian — people assume you have the virus in your body." | Follow micdotcom

an Ebola Halloween costume with someone in blackface………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

………………………………………

bopeep:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

politicsoflanguage:

Americans and ebola, recently on twitter.

Americans.

cool
bopeep:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

politicsoflanguage:

Americans and ebola, recently on twitter.

Americans.

cool
bopeep:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

politicsoflanguage:

Americans and ebola, recently on twitter.

Americans.

cool
bopeep:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

politicsoflanguage:

Americans and ebola, recently on twitter.

Americans.

cool
bopeep:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

politicsoflanguage:

Americans and ebola, recently on twitter.

Americans.

cool
bopeep:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

politicsoflanguage:

Americans and ebola, recently on twitter.

Americans.

cool
bopeep:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

politicsoflanguage:

Americans and ebola, recently on twitter.

Americans.

cool
bopeep:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

politicsoflanguage:

Americans and ebola, recently on twitter.

Americans.

cool
bopeep:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

politicsoflanguage:

Americans and ebola, recently on twitter.

Americans.

cool
bopeep:

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

politicsoflanguage:

Americans and ebola, recently on twitter.

Americans.

cool

b0mbb:

c-hange:

super-who-lockian:

rawrxja:

"I saw this elderly gentleman dining by himself, with an old picture of a lady in front of him. I though maybe I could brighten his day by talking to him. 

As I had assumed, she was his wife. But I didn’t expect such an interesting story. They met when they were both 17. They dated briefly, then lost contact when he went to war and her family moved. But he said he thought about her the entire war. After his return, he decided to look for her. He searched for her for 10 years and never dated anyone. People told him he was crazy, to which he replied “I am. Crazy in love”. On a trip to California, he went to a barber shop. He told the barber how he had been searching for a girl for ten years. The barber went to his phone and called his daughter in. It was her! She had also been searching for him and never dated either. 

He proposed immediately and they were married for 55 years before her death 5 years ago. He still celebrates her birthday and their anniversary. He takes her picture with him everywhere and kisses her goodnight. 

Some inspiring things he said;

"I was a very rich man. Not with money, but with love"

"I never had a single argument with my wife, but we had lots of debates"

"People are like candles. At any moment a breeze can blow it out, so enjoy the light while you have it."

"Tell your wife that you love her everyday. And be sure to ask her, have I told you that I love you lately?"

Be sure to talk to the elderly. Especially strangers. You may think that you will brighten their day, but you may be surprised that they can actually brighten yours.”

This is beautiful.

I cried.

this is wonderful and amazing and one of the reasons i volunteer with old people

:’)

(via prettythingsandbigwords)


I’m about challenging people. Like, properly challenging them and their assumptions. Audiences make their minds up about people they see on screen, just like they do in real life. That’s what fascinates me in film. You see a character and have to think: is this person different to what I assumed he was when I first saw him? - Steve Mc Queen

I’m about challenging people. Like, properly challenging them and their assumptions. Audiences make their minds up about people they see on screen, just like they do in real life. That’s what fascinates me in film. You see a character and have to think: is this person different to what I assumed he was when I first saw him? - Steve Mc Queen

I’m about challenging people. Like, properly challenging them and their assumptions. Audiences make their minds up about people they see on screen, just like they do in real life. That’s what fascinates me in film. You see a character and have to think: is this person different to what I assumed he was when I first saw him? - Steve Mc Queen

I’m about challenging people. Like, properly challenging them and their assumptions. Audiences make their minds up about people they see on screen, just like they do in real life. That’s what fascinates me in film. You see a character and have to think: is this person different to what I assumed he was when I first saw him? - Steve Mc Queen

(via seulmates)