sparklefairydust:

askthegrandhighboob:

fullofsinfullust:

zzazu:

trenzalord:

geometricdeathtrap:

pugsies:

PLEASE READ. WILL NOT HURT TO AND FORWARD.

Kids are putting Drano, tin foil, and a little water in plastic drink bottles
and capping it up - leaving it on lawns, in mail boxes, in gardens, on driveways etc. just waiting for you to pick it up intending to put it in the rubbish, but you’ll never make it!!!

If the bottle is picked up, and the bottle is shaken even just a little - in about 30 seconds or less it builds up enough gas which then explodes with enough force to remove some your extremities. The liquid that comes out is
boiling hot as well.

Don’t pick up any plastic bottles that may be lying in your yards or in the gutter, etc.

Pay attention to this. A plastic bottle with a cap. A little Drano. A little water. A small piece of foil.
Disturb it by moving it; and BOOM!! No fingers left and other serious effects to your face, eyes, etc.

Please ensure that everyone that may not have email access are also informed of this. 

Snopes confirms.

I’ve dealt with these before. If you find one:

  • Do not touch it
  • Do not touch it
  • Clear the area around it. It will explode on its own in time.
  • Once it explodes, do not make contact with the liquid inside. If needed, flush it away with large amounts of water.
  • Do not try to detonate it. You’ll probably be disfigured.

I’ve seen what these can do. The acidic liquid inside can strip the paint off a car.

when i visited vancouver these were everywhere. it’s not a fucking joke they’re actually scary

Just a reminder that there are awful shitty people out there doing awful shitty things to everyone else

there was a bunch of these at disneyland

i found one in my back yard, when i let my dogs out, i pulled them back inside, took my cousins bb shotgun and shot it from a safe distance (i was in my house and shot from the screen door. When it went off, my family and neighbors came running to see if everything was ok. I told them what happened and to watch out for them. 

These things are not a joke! When we went to check the damage there was a fucking hole in the ground. The dirt in my yard is like CLAY.

This shit is bad news

PLEASE DON’T BE AN ASSHAT. PLEASE DON’T LEAVE BOMBS IN PEOPLE’S YARDS.

(via joost5)

whisper-s-of-the-heart:

Kiki’s Delivery Service
whisper-s-of-the-heart:

Kiki’s Delivery Service
museemagazine:

Sally Gall
"UNBOUND"
“Unbound” opens March 14th at the Julie Saul Gallery
Our bodies are bound to earth by gravity. We imagine our “souls” will eventually drift away from our bodies … and that we will be unbound. Small wonder that we fly in our dreams and that heaven is always thought of as up.Most of the time we experience the world with the horizon as our reference. In my new work, I wish to evoke the feeling of floating ungrounded, to transport the viewer to a place not bound by gravity, and to escape the constraint of our usual horizon-oriented experience.
To achieve this, I often use a vertical format and no definable horizon. And because flight of any kind (including out-of- body travel) is a narrative event, I’ve composed several new works as diptychs and triptychs. These cinematic “image poems” were initially influenced by Asian scrolls and screens which have always had a strong allure for me. Asian scrolls and screens have epic intentions, the ability to condense images of a large world into intimate space, and a deep reverence for nature, all of which are issues I explore.
In Unbound, clouds, airplanes, and contrails (evidence of a plane’s passage) figure prominently. I imagine planes as poetic objects, heavy metal bodies, which appear to float with ease. Clouds, which can contain literally tons of water, also appear weightless. Clouds, airplanes and contrails share the airspace we inhabit when we are unbound. If they can escape the constraints of gravity, why shouldn’t we?
Images courtesy of the Julie Saul Gallery
Text courtesy of Sally Gall
museemagazine:

Sally Gall
"UNBOUND"
“Unbound” opens March 14th at the Julie Saul Gallery
Our bodies are bound to earth by gravity. We imagine our “souls” will eventually drift away from our bodies … and that we will be unbound. Small wonder that we fly in our dreams and that heaven is always thought of as up.Most of the time we experience the world with the horizon as our reference. In my new work, I wish to evoke the feeling of floating ungrounded, to transport the viewer to a place not bound by gravity, and to escape the constraint of our usual horizon-oriented experience.
To achieve this, I often use a vertical format and no definable horizon. And because flight of any kind (including out-of- body travel) is a narrative event, I’ve composed several new works as diptychs and triptychs. These cinematic “image poems” were initially influenced by Asian scrolls and screens which have always had a strong allure for me. Asian scrolls and screens have epic intentions, the ability to condense images of a large world into intimate space, and a deep reverence for nature, all of which are issues I explore.
In Unbound, clouds, airplanes, and contrails (evidence of a plane’s passage) figure prominently. I imagine planes as poetic objects, heavy metal bodies, which appear to float with ease. Clouds, which can contain literally tons of water, also appear weightless. Clouds, airplanes and contrails share the airspace we inhabit when we are unbound. If they can escape the constraints of gravity, why shouldn’t we?
Images courtesy of the Julie Saul Gallery
Text courtesy of Sally Gall
museemagazine:

Sally Gall
"UNBOUND"
“Unbound” opens March 14th at the Julie Saul Gallery
Our bodies are bound to earth by gravity. We imagine our “souls” will eventually drift away from our bodies … and that we will be unbound. Small wonder that we fly in our dreams and that heaven is always thought of as up.Most of the time we experience the world with the horizon as our reference. In my new work, I wish to evoke the feeling of floating ungrounded, to transport the viewer to a place not bound by gravity, and to escape the constraint of our usual horizon-oriented experience.
To achieve this, I often use a vertical format and no definable horizon. And because flight of any kind (including out-of- body travel) is a narrative event, I’ve composed several new works as diptychs and triptychs. These cinematic “image poems” were initially influenced by Asian scrolls and screens which have always had a strong allure for me. Asian scrolls and screens have epic intentions, the ability to condense images of a large world into intimate space, and a deep reverence for nature, all of which are issues I explore.
In Unbound, clouds, airplanes, and contrails (evidence of a plane’s passage) figure prominently. I imagine planes as poetic objects, heavy metal bodies, which appear to float with ease. Clouds, which can contain literally tons of water, also appear weightless. Clouds, airplanes and contrails share the airspace we inhabit when we are unbound. If they can escape the constraints of gravity, why shouldn’t we?
Images courtesy of the Julie Saul Gallery
Text courtesy of Sally Gall
museemagazine:

Sally Gall
"UNBOUND"
“Unbound” opens March 14th at the Julie Saul Gallery
Our bodies are bound to earth by gravity. We imagine our “souls” will eventually drift away from our bodies … and that we will be unbound. Small wonder that we fly in our dreams and that heaven is always thought of as up.Most of the time we experience the world with the horizon as our reference. In my new work, I wish to evoke the feeling of floating ungrounded, to transport the viewer to a place not bound by gravity, and to escape the constraint of our usual horizon-oriented experience.
To achieve this, I often use a vertical format and no definable horizon. And because flight of any kind (including out-of- body travel) is a narrative event, I’ve composed several new works as diptychs and triptychs. These cinematic “image poems” were initially influenced by Asian scrolls and screens which have always had a strong allure for me. Asian scrolls and screens have epic intentions, the ability to condense images of a large world into intimate space, and a deep reverence for nature, all of which are issues I explore.
In Unbound, clouds, airplanes, and contrails (evidence of a plane’s passage) figure prominently. I imagine planes as poetic objects, heavy metal bodies, which appear to float with ease. Clouds, which can contain literally tons of water, also appear weightless. Clouds, airplanes and contrails share the airspace we inhabit when we are unbound. If they can escape the constraints of gravity, why shouldn’t we?
Images courtesy of the Julie Saul Gallery
Text courtesy of Sally Gall

museemagazine:

Sally Gall

"UNBOUND"

“Unbound” opens March 14th at the Julie Saul Gallery

Our bodies are bound to earth by gravity. We imagine our “souls” will eventually drift away from our bodies … and that we will be unbound. Small wonder that we fly in our dreams and that heaven is always thought of as up.Most of the time we experience the world with the horizon as our reference. In my new work, I wish to evoke the feeling of floating ungrounded, to transport the viewer to a place not bound by gravity, and to escape the constraint of our usual horizon-oriented experience.

To achieve this, I often use a vertical format and no definable horizon. And because flight of any kind (including out-of- body travel) is a narrative event, I’ve composed several new works as diptychs and triptychs. These cinematic “image poems” were initially influenced by Asian scrolls and screens which have always had a strong allure for me. Asian scrolls and screens have epic intentions, the ability to condense images of a large world into intimate space, and a deep reverence for nature, all of which are issues I explore.

In Unbound, clouds, airplanes, and contrails (evidence of a plane’s passage) figure prominently. I imagine planes as poetic objects, heavy metal bodies, which appear to float with ease. Clouds, which can contain literally tons of water, also appear weightless. Clouds, airplanes and contrails share the airspace we inhabit when we are unbound. If they can escape the constraints of gravity, why shouldn’t we?

Images courtesy of the Julie Saul Gallery

Text courtesy of Sally Gall

(via journalofanobody)

could this be another end to the same chapter

Are you known by what you confess/divulge, or by what people interpret of what you do? Granted, the former is open to ambiguity and lost in translation as well. But could it be, then, that we float through our entire existence without once ever meeting someone who truly understands us? And, even scarier, and lonelier perhaps: could we ever truly understand ourselves when our identities are constantly struck by doubt, excess; inherent fluidity and external influences?

But at the end of the day what does this even matter. We simply create a concept of the self we can grapple with; were it simultaneously expansive yet exclusive enough - I hesitate to use the word “true” - there poses no fatality to the understanding of our existence. Were it too limited (repressed), or even fearfully so, inauthentic (manipulated), what else is there to be done but to continuously draw and redraw the boundaries of our self-identity. As long as desire exists, and cultures and peoples exist, we cannot be pure of seeding doubt, we cannot lose our inhibitions, we cannot tear free of a crippled or coloured perception of our selves.

The engine of life therefore lies not in a spiritual stage of contentment nor enlightenment of the self. Ignorance and deception are instead the instinctive mechanisms we rely on to tune us back into functioning, active community members. To be a stranger to others and oneself is an inevitability, but as far as loneliness does not presuppose emptiness, we are certainly not victims of a tragedy.

showslow:

Kate Powell

Here is my latest drawing, based on Natalya Lobanova’s quote “I tried to draw my soul but all I could think of was flowers”

I’m trying to express my frustration with myself; I have all these thoughts and feelings inside me but when I try to translate them to paper I end up with a load of flowers and butterflies every time. Maybe it’s not a bad thing, but I just want to make more personal art, I don’t want it to just look ‘pretty’, I want it to mean something.

gasoline-station:

Silver Shack
by Chae Pereira Architects gasoline-station:

Silver Shack
by Chae Pereira Architects gasoline-station:

Silver Shack
by Chae Pereira Architects
~~♡v♡~~
Salvador Dali, Summer.

tumblr seems to like him alot

(via pastured)